Ces’t la vie

we just are1

 

They told us that one day, we’d all be kings. Rockstars. Astronauts. Doctors who cured

cancer. Princesses. World Cup winners. They told us that we’re all special.

They told us that we would all make a dent in the universe.

They told us that we’d all perform feats of sheer audacity that would make the gods jealous

of us.

They told us that we’re all the sparks of Zeus, filled to the brim with infinite potential.

They told us that one day we’d all fall in love with our soul-mates and live happily ever after.

In doing so, they led us to believe that these were all the benchmarks for success. That

anything other than these would be a failure. A disappointment. That failing to make a dent

meant you had no right to live in the universe. We were led to believe that we’d never be

complete without our sleeping beauty or our very own knight in shining armour.

They never told us about the other side.

They never told us that most of us will see more failures than successes.

They never told us that on some days, our biggest achievement would be that we didn’t kill

ourselves.

They never told us that we’ll go in to life blind, unsure of every decision. They never told us

about the fight. The blood.

They never told us that we’ll spend most of our time questioning our choices, finding more

choices, analysing consequences, and still lose.

Most of us won’t get into history books. We won’t be having any patents or kingdoms under

our name. They won’t teach about us in schools. They won’t name meteors after us. When

we die, there won’t be national holidays. No 21 gun salute.

They never told us it’s all okay.

Unknown to ourselves, we all have an impact on our surroundings. Like gravity. Like

sunlight, we just don’t know what we illuminate.

A friend, who needed you to just listen.

A parent, to whom your very existence means the world.

A random stranger, who just wanted someone to smile at them.

The stray down the street whose eyes twinkle every time you walk up to it with a biscuit.

We don’t need to be gods to make our presence felt. We just need to be human.

This is life. And it’s quite alright.

 

 

Submitted by Shyam Kamal